Hyperhidrosis

Excessive sweating or hyperhidrosis, at one time could only be treated by surgery, but now the solution can be a simple BOTOX® injection.

Why choose hyperhidrosis?
Why treat excessive sweating with Botox?
How does hyperhidrosis treatment work?
What does hyperhidrosis treatment cost?
Real Patient Story
Botox, the final answer for excess sweating?

Who would have thought it? The most well-known and popular non-surgical anti-ageing beauty treatment for the last 15 years can also stop those embarrassing wet patches under your arms!

Excessive perspiration, or hyperhidrosis as its known, is a daily problem for many people. Hyperhydrosis is excessive sweating and most commonly begins in childhood or adolescence.

Expensive antiperspirants often only slightly reduce the problem and the dampness is still visible. What’s worse, many people report that worrying about their sweating actually makes them sweat more. This can be a real blight on people’s lives, especially when the problem gets so bad that they avoiding social situations, and may suffer a severe loss of confidence socially or in the work place.

The most commonly affected areas are armpits, palms of the hands or soles of the feet as these areas have a high concentration of “sweat producing glands” called eccrine glands.

Thankfully Botox is now considered somewhat of a miracle cure for some, and it just may be the answer you’ve been looking for.

Botox, the final answer for excess sweating?
Why treat hyperhidrosis with Botox...

Sweating is a normal way for our bodies to regulate temperature. But with it’s produced in greater quantities than needed, leading to clammy hands and embarrassing wet patches under arms and even a severe loss of confidence in social situations.

Using a simple botox injection to treat underarm sweating is just as effective as surgery used to be, without the risks or costs involved. Before any treatment you’ll need to discuss your condition with our doctor. That’s because your sweating may also be caused by an overactive thyroid, diabetes, an anxiety disorder or other medical condition, and other tests might be needed.

Why treat hyperhidrosis with Botox...
How to treat excessive sweating with Botox...

In its simplest terms, Botox works by telling your nerves to stop receiving messages from the brain, and the ones linked to your sweat glands are very similar to those in the muscles that cause wrinkles. Hence an injection can stop your sweat glands being ‘told’ to sweat. A mixture of iodine and cornstarch is used to highlight the glands, then a series of tiny, shallow injections (between 10 to 30) stops them being active for up to a year. Your armpits aren’t particularly sensitive, so the pain is minimal.

How to treat excessive sweating with Botox...
What is the price of hyperhidrosis treatment?

Hyperhidrosis treatment using Botox to stop excessive sweating available at our Manchester clinic. See prices below:

 

Treatment Prices
Hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating) - Botox £425

Pay monthly via Direct Debit available at £54.17 per month (deposit payable at appointment)

Click for more information on our prices – Direct debit prices

Please note that the amount of correction required, lifestyle, skin types, and area of the face will all vary the longevity of treatment results & amount of treatment recommended

What is the price of hyperhidrosis treatment?
Lee's Experience of hyperhidrosis treatment

“I first noticed I sweated more than I should from my armpits in my teens and it quickly got me down. Staining on shirts and constant wetness even on cold days made life pretty miserable. I tried various topical treatments and different roll-ons but nothing worked. Then, during my 20s, I heard about how heavy sweating can be treated using Botox injections. I was curious but naturally a bit apprehensive!

“At the appointment I had a chat with a SkinViva’s Dr Nicole. She explained the side effects, expected results and what I would feel as she carried out the treatment. I’m happy to say that the procedure wasn’t painful. I felt the prick of the needle in a few places but nothing major. I was in and out in about 30 minutes.

“A few days later I had already noticed a BIG difference. My armpits were no longer dripping sweat onto my shirts when I was in the office and I could finally start to walk around in public without keeping my arms pinned to my side!

“Looking back, I estimate I got around 9 months from my treatment.”

Video

Lee's Experience of hyperhidrosis treatment

Our treatments may be similar to others. But the difference is the way we use them. So, why not arrange your FREE consultation today?

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This video shows a consultation being carried out on a patient with excessive sweating by Dr Tim Pearce, discussing the condition and the treatment.


Most people would refer to hyperhidrosis more commonly as "excessive sweating". "Hidrosis" means sweating and "hyper" means more.

It's perfectly normal to sweat - indeed, our bodies sweat in order regulate temperate. Our sweat helps to cool us down. Some of us however sweat a little too much which may mean you have hyperhidrosis. The problem can affect us all over our bodies or in key areas where there are more sweat glands such as the armpits, hands, face, and feet. At best, it can be uncomfortable and annoying but at it's worst it's embarrassing and socially isolating.

The causes for hyperhidrosis aren't fully understood yet by doctors. When people develop excessive sweating at varying stages of their life they typically have normal sweat glands but their sympathetic response is higher than the average. It's this response which leads to overproduction and sweat for reasons we're not fully clear of.

Studies show that hyperhidrosis may affect as many as between 3-5% of the population.


Two types of hyperhidrosis exist:

Primary hyperhidrosis: usually inherited and so check with your family to see if they suffer from it
Secondary hyperhidrosis: caused by behaviours (e.g. alcoholism), responses (e.g. neurologic responses such as anxiety), a condition (e.g. gout, obesity, menpause), or perhaps medications


Facial Hyperhidrosis/Blushing—flushing and sweating of the face
Axillary hyperhidrosis—excessive underarm sweating
Palmar hyperhidrosis—excessive sweating of the hands
Pedal Hyperhidrosis—excessive feet sweating. Sweating on the hands can be linked to feet sweating.


The area that you are treating should be shaved and the client should abstain from using any antiperspirants or deodorants for 24 hours prior to the treatment


When we sweat a chemical message is sent from the brain to the sweat glands telling them to 'turn on' the sweat. Botox is used in a very similar way to how it is used to treat wrinkles. The Botox effectively blocks the chemical message from the brain to the sweat glands so that the message isn't received turning on the sweat. Over time, the nerve endings at the sweat glands start to grow back so that from perhaps the 4th month some very mild sweating will return. As more and more nerve endings grow back so the sweating will start to increase again. Ultimately, for up to a year Botox injections can stop the sweat glands from receiving the message to sweat more. Once all the nerve endings have regrown, re-treatment will be required to produce the same effect.


Botox was not the first ever treatment to tackle underarm sweating. In an attempt to manage the problem and to target these nerves, some people chose to have the nerves permanently severed in an operation to stop hyperhidrosis. Thanks to Botox, however, today we have a far easier option that’s just as effective without the costs or risks of surgery.


It’s important that before you have this treatment you discuss the problem with one of SkinViva’s Clinicians. In most cases hyperhidrosis is idiopathic – the medical terminology that means we unfortunately don’t know why you get it.

However, it can also be a sign of a medical condition such as an overactive thyroid, diabetes or generalised anxiety disorder. Usually these conditions are not the cause, but in rare instances your clinician may ask for further tests to be done, usually through your GP.


To treat underarm sweating first the glands need to be found. This is done with a simple but ingenious technique using surgical iodine and a dusting of cornstarch. The glands which produce the sweat rapidly become highlighted when the corn starch dissolves with iodine, so the troublesome sweat glands can be targeted. A tiny injection is all that’s required in each gland to stop its activity for 6-12 months. Most people have quite a few glands, so expect 10 to 30 shallow injections to really nail the problem. Thankfully your armpits are not a very sensitive area, and the injections are as small as they come so the pain is minimal.


Yes, we also offer botox injections for sweaty hands, or palmar hyperhidrosis. Results last for several months.


The price of hyperhidrosis treatment at SkinViva is £425 or if you pay monthly via direct debit, we'll make it the equivalent of £395.


- Apply anti-antiperspirant as often and as regular as you can (remember antiperspirant is different to body spray!)
- Drink lots of water - aim for 2 litres per day
- Exercise regularly (although exercise makes you sweat, it will have a positive effect on stress & anxiety which will in the longer term improve your sweating when you're not busy exercising!)
- Keep a change of clothes handy especially for when doing presentations or attending social situations
- Easier said than done but try to avoid stressful situations that you don't need
- Eat healthily to keep your weight under control - overweight people tend to sweat more
- Wearing black, white or patterned clothing can minimise the signs of sweating – it tends to be more visible on plain colours
- Remember to use antiperspirant rather than body sprays or deodorants – look for extra strong formula or long-lasting claims


The armpits are not an overly sensitive area so most patients report very little discomfort. Some small amounts of discomfort may be experienced but our doctors are all very sensitive to your needs and how to deliver as comfortable an experience as possible.


No, you must wait until 24 hours after your Botox treatment before you can go running or do any other form of strenuous exercise.


Yes you can. If you are having Botox treatment THEN another treatment, you must leave it 48 hours. If you had another treatment and then you wanted Botox, you would have to wait 2 weeks before having your Botox treatment.


For the following 24 hours after you receive Botox treatment, you must not drink alcohol. After 24 hours, it is fine to drink Alcohol.


You should have your Botox treatment before having semi-permanent make up treatment on your eye-brows. This is because the Botox can move the position of your eye-brows temporarily.


You should avoid heat for 24 hours. This includes the sun, sunbeds and hot baths and showers.


Yes, there is no problem with flying after having Botox treatment.


No! Botox is not addictive. It does really work though so, like a good haircut, most clients do want to keep up the fab results once they’ve started having Botox and come back every 4 months or so to have another treatment.


You need to wait 12 weeks between full treatment doses.


The effects of Botox treatment are not seen immediately. You should start to notice a difference about 3-7 days after your appointment and the treatment will be at its maximum at day 14. We will send you a text message after 14 days to check how your treatment is looking. If you would like an adjustment to your Botox, you’re welcome to book back in to be seen within the first month after your initial treatment and this will be free of charge.


Not necessarily. Many people do not need to come back in for an adjustment. It is a personal choice, not a clinical necessity. We will send you a text message after 14 days to check how your treatment is looking. If you would like an adjustment to your Botox, you’re welcome to book back in to be seen within the first month after your initial treatment.


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